Vol. 01.19.2020 | Sunday Selects | O R G A N I C

MARLIES HOEVERS

Marlies Hoevers was born in the Netherlands and got her bachelor of design at the Royal Academy of Art in 2006. She started her career as a certified interior architect with Merkx+Girod Architects, a leading architecture studio in The Netherlands, based in Amsterdam. It was during that time Marlies developed a strong fascination for materials, their appearance and their emotional effects on people.

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JÁNOS HUSZTI

Huszti elaborates his constantly changing topics with momentum and precision. He depicts historical times, special characters and places from the past, using all kinds of materials to express his interpretations.

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JOHN PAUL PHILIPPE

John-Paul Philippe is a native Oklahoma born artist and designer splitting his time between New York City and Sharon, CT. John-Paul’s work ranges from paintings & murals to large scale interior design elements such as integrated metal sculpture in both commercial and private venues.

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SILVIA POLOTO

Brazilian-born Silvia Poloto is an accomplished artist working in a range of visual disciplines. She is known for her lively abstract canvases and mixed-media sculptures. Recognized for her dynamic compositions and color sensibility, Poloto exploits a vibrant visual vocabulary of boldness and subtlety. Her deftly handled juxtapositions unfold in rich, textured hues and expressive gesture.

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HOW JEAN GEORGE VONGERICHTEN WENT FROM NO GOOD KID TO 4 STAR CHEF

This is how it began, the career of one of the most versatile, ingenious and adventurous chefs in the history of American cuisine. Jean-Georges Vongerichten can pinpoint the day, the place, the words. His family had taken him to Auberge de l’Ill, a restaurant with three Michelin stars in Alsace, the French region where they lived, to celebrate his 16th birthday. To the table came the renowned chef Paul Haeberlin, and the boy’s father requested a favor.“My father liked to talk,” Mr. Vongerichten recalled. “He already had three glasses of wine, and he said to the chef: ‘My son is no good. Do you need somebody to wash dishes? He will do it.’ ”

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LALLA ROOKH PIE

This celebratory pie is only as good as the quality of your ingredients: look for a premium ice cream and top-shelf liquor. English-style digestive biscuits have a distinctive wholemeal texture with a buttery richness and an undertone of brown sugar. They are addictive on their own, enhanced by the addition of browned butter and toasted walnuts. While graham crackers make a perfectly agreeable substitute, true digestive biscuits are a small luxury well worth tracking down.

EAT

BOURBON, ORANGE, AND GINGER

At the time of year when we’re gearing up to put ginger in cookies and quick breads, this cocktail is a reminder of the root’s bright spiciness.  

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CAN YOU DIG IT? 1969

Spotify Playlist with hits from 1969.

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HIDDEN DETAILS OF THE NEW YORK PUBLIC LIBRARY

Noted historians serve as your personal audio guide through a virtual walking tour of the New York Public Library. Find out about hidden details of the famed NYC building as these expert reveal the history behind the Winnie the Pooh toys, the Rose Main Reading Room, the iconic lion statues Patience and Fortitude, the Stephen A. Schwarzman building, the Milstein Division, the map collection, the book train and more.

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Vol. 01.23.2020 | Artist Spotlight Pascal Pierme

Francois Mitterrand said, “I love the person who is searching, yet I am afraid of the one who thinks he has found the answer.” In my life I have much more pleasure with the questions than with finding the answers, except when the answer is a new question. And that is where the obsession to create begins.

My work presents a sweet interrogation versus a statement. Success occurs when the viewer feels involved in the creativity. They ask their own questions that are perhaps different from mine, even if to find the same answer. To me, nothing is more boring than to be in total control.

I am inspired by the verb more than the adjective. I want my work to be recognized by its essence, not by the way it appears. By not being locked in to a “category” I am able to maintain freedom. This allows for a constant evolution in medium and subject.

Much like creating a novel in just a few sentences, I am creating a fundamental alphabet with which to speak my own language. Getting to the essential is the most difficult part for me and for many artists. We often put too much varnish on words, expressions, or attitudes. Through this process my work has become more minimal. Maturity has also given me the ability to take more risks

For decades, balance, movement, inquiry, architecture and nature have been reoccurring themes in my work. I am interested in assimilating what is not supposed to fit – the combining of contrasting elements. My main ingredient is chemistry. I feel the movement and then freeze that moment in the interaction and take a “snapshot” – capturing a split second in the evolution. Thereby creating something that is abstract and at the same time, quite figurative. As such, my work can be experienced as organic. It moves. It is alive, it comes from somewhere, it is going somewhere, and you feel that by what you see.

I try to sculpt in a way where I can change my mind until the last minute. My creativity is at its best when I push the medium of my work to its limit.

Art, amore, and adventure!

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Vol. 01.12.2020 | Sunday Selects

DOUG FREED

Doug Freed attempts to capture the mystical light found in natural atmospheric effects: the haze in the distance on humid summer days, the overcast gloom of winter skies, and the softness of landscape bathed in fog, and the quieting mood of approaching darkness. In his luminescent multi-paneled oil paintings Freed tries to find the grey area between traditional landscape painting and its abstraction into color fields.

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VESELA BAKER

Acrylic and watercolor are the media of choice for me because of the fast drying process. I continue to learn every day, and my work constantly evolves, as I always have the desire to see things a bit different and in a new way.  I like switching between wood and paper, watercolor and acrylic. Because I spend so much time in the studio, that helps me to not get stuck. It forces me to see things from a different perspective and breaks my thought process so I can take a fresh approach. Once in a while, I feel like I have to have some more control and need to slow down so I paint realism.

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KIMERLEE CURYL

“Wild Mustangs. Without them, the great west was not possible. We traveled, explored, and built this land by holding onto their manes and riding the spirit of their hearts. We can honor that gift by being their voice. These beautiful legends, magnificent symbols of freedom and grace are being stripped from their homes, families torn apart and an icon will soon be lost forever. It is my hope to not only celebrate the beauty and magnificence of these creatures but to help them.

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JIM POLAN

Jim Polan loves stories. He tells them, he paints them. Sometimes the title precedes the paint, but sometimes it’s the other way around. In most works, the title is intended to be a compositional element. The works, more or less, are edited action paintings with narratives. Despite his three degrees, Polan still claims that whatever he learned of art, he learned in his father’s studio.

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Pieter Hugo inside his studio sitting on a table next to a skeleton.

ARTIST’S QUESTIONNAIREI’M FINISHED WHEN I START LOOKING AT THE WORLD IN A DIFFERENT WAY

The photographer Pieter Hugo who has captured scenes from Nigeria to Mexico takes T Magazine inside his studio.

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HOW TO GET YOUR KIDS.. OR YOUTO EAT A GIANT TRAY OF VEGETABLES

Deb Perlman of “Smitten Kitchen” discusses her way of feeding her kids nutritious food. My general philosophy when it comes to feeding my kids is to cook what I crave, then find ways to add bait that will bring them to the table. This warm sheet-pan salad takes inspiration from fattoush, the bright, juicy-crunchy Levantine salad of tomatoes, cucumber, herbs, and crispy pita bread we love to eat during the summer. In the middle of winter, I opt for a seasonally appropriate cast of squash, cabbage, and red onion, which get roasted on high heat until the squash caramelizes, the cabbage frizzles and crisps, and the onion becomes toasty and mellow. I finish them with cider vinegar, which adds complex sweetness, and sumac, the tart spice that’s essential in classic fattoush.

EAT

THREE CAMPARI COCKTAILS YOU DON’T NEED A GAZILLION OTHER INGREDIENTS TO MAKE

What is Campari, anyway? Well, it’s one of Italy’s most iconic aperitivos—a word that refers to both a range of bitter liqueurs and aromatized wines as well as the pre-dinner hours in which they are habitually consumed—and was formulated in 1860 by a fellow from Novara named Gaspare Campari. (Save that fun fact for your next dinner party.)

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THE LUMINEERS III TELLS A DEEPLY PERSONAL STORY

Already one of the biggest bands in the world, The Lumineers did something adventurous on the group’s third album, III: The Denver-based group created a record divided into three chapters, telling the story of a family across three generations and how addiction touched those lives. And while it’s not the upbeat singalong music that the band is typically known for, the subject matter was important to The Lumineers’ co-founders, drummer Jeremiah Fraites and singer Wesley Schultz. Both had witnessed the aftermath of addiction firsthand.

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INSIDE DAVID HARBOUR’S NEW YORK LOFT

Today we take you to New York, NY to visit the home of “Stranger Things” star David Harbour. In the heart of the city but lush with houseplants and bathed in natural light, it’s the perfect place to find your center while still in the center of it all.

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Vol. 01.14.2020 | Artist Spotlight Patrick Adams

“I have been painting images of the landscape for over twenty years now in an attempt to convey the experience of being in this vast, ever-changing space of light and form. However, I am not interested in simply producing a painting with a likeness to a particular place. What does interest me is expressing my existentially confirmed experience of a place; or, perhaps I should say, its essence.”

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