Vol. 07.28.2019 | Sunday Selects

BILL CLAPS

Visual artist and writer Bill Claps meditates every morning. “I find that the most important thing to me is to listen and be open to what the world presents to me. It’s amazing what happens to me when my mind is clear,” says Claps. He explains that he doesn’t seek inspiration, but rather finds that the ideas seem to present themselves and if he is open he can “grab onto them quickly before they go away.”

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KOLLABS

The artists present a provocative series of collaborative paintings and installations that create a sense of wonder evoking questions on, and of, the interaction between human life and the forest environment.

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OBJECTS

Exhibit by Aberson has been searching for and acquiring objects from around the world. A fusion of modern design and primitive form, these design objects are hand-selected to add texture and interest to spaces.

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KELSEY IRVIN

 Kelsey Irvin’s work is collecting traces of peoples lives. Her work is very much related to memories and storylines.

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THESE HISTORIC LANDMARK BUILDINGS HAVE BECOME HOMES TO CUTTING EDGE ART

With revitalization in mind, Deborah Berke Partners and 21c Museum Hotels are repurposing historic buildings designed by prominent architects in cities like Oklahoma City, Durham, and Cincinnati into hotbeds of contemporary art.

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SPICY TAHINI AND AVOCADO SOBA

Soba + tahini + avocado? Enough said. This full- meal noodle salad is one of my favorite ways to fill up on good carbs, healthy fats, and plenty of nutrient-rich greens.

EAT

SHISO HIGHBALL

Ubiquitous in Japan, the whisky highball, like so much of Japanese drinking culture, has become an object of fascination on this side of the Pacific in recent years. 

DRINK

FOOD FORWARD: CHINESE WINE

France, Italy, Spain, and Argentina are all known for producing wine. But what about China? Winemaker Emma Gao is hoping to make it so. The wine she produces at Silver Heights vineyard in the country’s Ningxia region is winning over critics and wine drinkers at home and abroad.

WATCH

THE UNIVERSAL PAGE

Andrew Leland loves print, however, he has a condition that will eventually change his relationship to it pretty radically. He’s going blind. And this fact has made him deeply curious about how blind people experience literature.

LISTEN